Monday, April 05, 2010

black-eyed susan

In the interest of not embarrassing myself too deeply on basically every level - I will limit the written portion of this post to an absolute minimum. Due entirely to my inability to form coherent sentences after sustaining a concussion after blacking out in the bathroom and falling face first onto a tile floor. I spent the weekend in the hospital for observation and it was decided that there is nothing wrong with my heart or my head. Not that that was the question I went in with. It was a tedious, unenlightening experience, but hey, I'm not dead! I just have a goose egg on my forehead, a black eye, a sore nose and jaw, a chipped tooth and my fine motor skills leave a bit to be desired.

So with that NOT in mind - I would like to again draw your attention to my forthcoming Great Swedish Adventure. And also this spiffy self portrait I created in its honor!

dalahäst kicey
dalahäst kicey © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

A note about the painting on my face - I was inspired by Sandra (my Swedish friend) who recommended I do a distinctly "Swedish" self portrait. She properly introduced me to the Dalahäst while we were in Iceland, when she brought a tote decorated with the traditional red toy horses. I had seen them before at Ikea in years past but never knew their significance or name.

From the Dalecarnian Horse Wiki:

A Dalecarlian horse or Dala horse (Swedish: Dalahäst) is a traditional wooden statuette of a horse originating in the Swedish province of Dalarna. In the old days the Dala horse was mostly used as a toy for children; in modern times it has become a symbol of Dalarna as well as Sweden in general.

Traditionally a Dala horse is painted bright red with details and a harness in white, green, yellow and blue. It may also be painted bright blue or, if originating from the Rättvik area, grey. The distinctive shape of the horse is due to the usage of flat-plane style carving. The wood blocks used for making the horses were originally scrap wood from the clock case industry in the region of Dalarna.

It was in the small log cabins deep in the forests during the long winter nights in front of a log fire that the forerunner of the dala horse was born. Using simple tools, generally only a knife, woodcarvers made toys for their children. It was only natural that many of these toys were horses, because the horse was invaluable in those days—a trusty friend and worker who could pull great loads of timber from the forests during the winter months, and in the summer could be of just as much use on the farm.

The earliest references to wooden horses for sale are from 1623—nearly 400 years ago. The pattern of today is about 150 years old, and it reflects a style of painting known as kurbits. In the 19th century, Stickå-Erik Hansson from Mora introduced the technique of painting with two colours on the same brush, still used today. The Dalecarlian horse of today is still a handcrafted article, made of pine. At least nine different people contribute their skills to create each horse.

The traditional pattern is painted free-hand by practised "ripple" painters. The art of rippling requires great skill and takes many years to learn. Finally, "all the fine horses" are varnished and sent out from Nusnäs to serve as a symbol of Sweden in the outside world.


Please consider supporting my project- creating a photo book and travelogue based on my trip to Sweden. There is a long list of places I might be visiting, most of which hinge on whether or not I will be able to afford doing so, and truly every little bit is appreciated and incredibly helpful. Another possibility is renting a castle (!!!!) for a photoshoot. And it is certainly not every day you can say you've rented a castle. Am I right?

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/kicey/stockholm-syndrome-a-jatte-swedish-adventure

Since I last posted I had some lovely outings including going to NYC to meet up with Sandra who was in town. We fought the rain and miserable weather to paint the town and get down to business discussing things I should do while in Sweden. Plus take a few photos of her irresistible face.

feather light
feather light / model & makeup: sandra © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

We also went to the Museum of Natural History to see the live butterfly exhibit, which was delightful, in a sweaty way.

lightest touch
lightest touch © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

We also spent some time with actor Joel Garland on the eve of his first big movie premiere - The Bounty Hunter. Congrats Joel!

cameo
cameo © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

Then a couple weekends ago I finally had the chance to meet up with Veronika Placek who runs the Etsy boutique Sweet Tooth Vintage - we had been planning on doing a shoot with her modeling some of her wares since early maybe February. Though it was a bit chilly, we still managed to capture a hint of Springtime loveliness, by way of sunshine, cute clothes and some of my favorite spots in Philly. (model/styling: Veronika Placek)

meadow
meadow © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

frozen
frozen © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

driven
driven © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

ring
ring © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

bella
bella © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

peaches and cream
peaches and cream © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

peeling back
peeling back © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

self service
self service © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

Also I took a little day trip to Island Beach State Park with Goldberg, thinking that while it was nearly 80˙ in Philly it would be likewise Down the Shore™. Incorrect! It was chilly but pretty and nearly Icelandic in appearance, sandy and mossy barrenness, with foxes!

driven
driven © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

low tide
low tide © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

sly
sly © Laura Kicey, All Rights Reserved.

And in published news, Context Magazine (AIA/Philadelphia's publication) - released a photo essay I shot featuring images of public urban spaces that were appropriated for sports usage.

Jennifer Nehila - practitioner of slacklining, Rittenhouse Park
Jennifer Nehila - practitioner of slacklining, Rittenhouse Park © Laura Kicey for Context Magazine, All Rights Reserved.

pickup basketball under I-95, 2nd & Washington
pickup basketball under I-95, 2nd & Washington © Laura Kicey for Context Magazine, All Rights Reserved.

volleyball court at 33rd & arch
volleyball court at 33rd & arch © Laura Kicey for Context Magazine, All Rights Reserved.

soccer in the bowl at Clark Park
soccer at the bowl in Clark Park © Laura Kicey for Context Magazine, All Rights Reserved.

Lastly one of the photos from my October collaboration with 28 Crash! Vintage, Genevieve @ Reinhard, Arpita P and April Ramirez - was published in ELIZA magazine! You can check the online issue for free here

ELIZA: published!

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1 Comments:

Blogger Remiss63 said...

Laura, a wonderful post, great photographs.

I hope your injuries clear up quickly so you can get back to doing the things you do so well. Be sure to give yourself time and space to recover. Don't push yourself to hard to fast.

1:39 AM, April 06, 2010  

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